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Sinclair Multifaith Campus Ministry

From the Chaplain

Welcome to the web page for Sinclair’s Multifaith Campus Alliance! I greet you on behalf of the students, faculty, and staff members who are committed to generating respectful conversation with others on their spiritual journey.

 

I listen to radio a lot. As a baseball fan, I find that the “audio only” way of following the sport is still superior to any high-definition, high-tech medium. As a fan of National Public Radio, I enjoy listening to the extended interviews that are the hallmark of many of their programs.

And I have come to appreciate one recurring phrase that I hear on the radio: “for those of you just tuning in.” When the announcer shares those words, I know that I will get a brief summary of what has been going on in the time since the program started. What I appreciate most about that phrase, though, is the courtesy that it indicates. The announcer passes no judgment; rather, those words recognize that my presence and attention now is a good thing, and with a little help I can be even more fully present in the conversation or event.

Consider how that phrase might apply to all of us engaging in multifaith dialogue. The task of getting acquainted with persons from different faith traditions (or persons who are “none of the above”) takes time and patience. We have a lot to learn about how to be respectful of the experience of others and what lessons we might take from them, to enrich our own journey.

Those words, “for those of you just tuning in,” remind me that our conversations are always works in progress. It is never too late for someone to join in and learn from others. The door is never completely closed. So I hope that you will tune in—and rejoice to welcome others who are tuning in as well.

I listen to radio a lot. As a baseball fan, I find that the “audio only” way of following the sport is still superior to any high-definition, high-tech medium. As a fan of National Public Radio, I enjoy listening to the extended interviews that are the hallmark of many of their programs.

 

And I have come to appreciate one recurring phrase that I hear on the radio: “for those of you just tuning in.” When the announcer shares those words, I know that I will get a brief summary of what has been going on in the time since the program started. What I appreciate most about that phrase, though, is the courtesy that it indicates. The announcer passes no judgment; rather, those words recognize that my presence and attention now is a good thing, and with a little help I can be even more fully present in the conversation or event.

 

Consider how that phrase might apply to all of us engaging in multifaith dialogue. The task of getting acquainted with persons from different faith traditions (or persons who are “none of the above”) takes time and patience. We have a lot to learn about how to be respectful of the experience of others and what lessons we might take from them, to enrich our own journey.

 

Those words, “for those of you just tuning in,” remind me that our conversations are always works in progress. It is never too late for someone to join in and learn from others. The door is never completely closed.  So I hope that you will tune in—and rejoice to welcome others who are tuning in as well.

 

Peace,

Larry Lindstrom

 

 

If you’re reading this, then you have been blessed with the gift of time. Each day of life is a blessing–and a challenge. How will we use the time that lies before us? Will we treasure it and spend it wisely? Or will we fritter it away, wasting it without realizing how precious it is?

I invite you to look around and see how you can use the gift of your time. Let’s make the most of it together, creating both memories and a lasting impact on the world around us. May your time be a blessing for yourself and others!

Peace,

Larry Lindstrom